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Kevin Cook

Biography

Kevin Cook

Kevin Cook is the author of ELECTRIC OCTOBER and several other books on sports and the people who play them, including TOMMY'S HONOR and THE DAD REPORT. He is a former senior editor at Sports Illustrated who has written for The New York Times, Men’s Journal, GQ, Playboy, Smithsonian and many other publications. He has appeared on CNN, ESPN and Fox TV. An Indiana native, he now lives in Northampton, Massachusetts.

Kevin Cook

Books by Kevin Cook

by Kevin Cook - Nonfiction, Sports

It was a Thursday at Chicago’s Wrigley Field, mostly sunny with the wind blowing out. Nobody expected an afternoon game between the Philadelphia Phillies and Chicago Cubs on May 17, 1979, to be much more than a lazy early-season contest matching two teams heading in opposite directions --- the first-place Phillies and the Cubs, those lovable losers --- until they combined for 13 runs in the first inning. “The craziest game ever,” one player called it. “And then the second inning started.” TEN INNINGS AT WRIGLEY is Kevin Cook’s vivid account of a game that only could have happened at this ballpark, in this era, with this colorful cast of heroes and heels.

by Kevin Cook - History, Nonfiction, Sports

The 1947 World Series was “the most exciting ever” in the words of Joe DiMaggio, with a decade’s worth of drama packed into seven games between the mighty New York Yankees and underdog Brooklyn Dodgers. It was Jackie Robinson’s first Series, a postwar spectacle featuring Frank Sinatra, Ernest Hemingway and President Harry Truman in supporting roles. It was also the first televised World Series --- sportswriters called it “Electric October.”

by Bret Boone and Kevin Cook - Memoir, Nonfiction, Sports

Bret Boone didn't care about family legacy as he fought his way into the Major Leagues in 1992; he wanted to make his own way. He did just that, building a 14-year career that included three all-star appearances, four Gold Gloves, a bout with alcoholism, and the ignominy of being traded for the infamous "player to be named later." Now that he's coaching minor leaguers half his age, and his 15-year-old son has the potential to be a fourth-generation major leaguer, Bret is ready to reflect on and tell the story of baseball from the perspective of his family's 70-year history in the sport.