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January 2015

January's roundup of History titles includes GATEWAY TO FREEDOM, in which Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner tells the dramatic story of fugitive slaves and the antislavery activists who defied the law to help them reach freedom; THE TRAIN TO CRYSTAL CITY by Jan Jarboe Russell, the never-before-told story of a secret FDR-approved American internment camp in Texas during World War II, where thousands of families --- many US citizens --- were incarcerated; IN THESE TIMES, a beautifully observed history of the British home front during the Napoleonic Wars by celebrated historian Jenny Uglow; and MARCHING HOME, a groundbreaking investigation from Civil War historian Brian Matthew Jordan examining the fate of Union veterans who won the war but couldn’t bear the peace.

December 2013

As 2013 comes to a close, history buffs will be delighted by the number of outstanding history books releasing this month. Among these December releases, which have been compiled by Bookreporter.com's Greg Fitzgerald, are HEIR TO THE EMPIRE CITY: New York and the Making of Theodore Roosevelt by Edward P. Kohn, WARSAW 1944: Hitler, Himmler, and the Warsaw Uprising by Alexandra Richie, BETWEEN MAN AND BEAST: An Unlikely Explorer and the African Adventure that Took the Victorian World by Storm by Monte Reel, and BEETHOVEN: THE MAN REVEALED by John Suchet.

Week of January 26, 2015

Releases for the week of January 26th include Karin Slaughter's first stand-alone novel, COP TOWN, an epic story of a city in the midst of seismic upheaval, a serial killer targeting cops, and a divided police force tasked with bringing a madman to justice; Isabel Allende's RIPPER, a fast-paced mystery involving a brilliant teenage sleuth who must unmask a serial killer in San Francisco; and CALL ME BURROUGHS by Beat historian Barry Miles, the first full-length biography of Augusten Burroughs to be published in a quarter century --- and the first one to chronicle the last decade of Burroughs' life and examine his long-term cultural legacy.