Biography

Glenn Frankel

Glenn Frankel is an author and journalist, based in Arlington Virginia. His most recent position was director of the School of Journalism and G.B. Dealey Regents Professor at the University of Texas at Austin, and he also spent four years as a visiting journalism professor at Stanford University. He was a longtime Washington Post reporter, editor and bureau chief in London, Southern Africa and Jerusalem, where he won the 1989 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting for “balanced and sensitive reporting” of Israel and the first Palestinian uprising. He later served as editor of the Washington Post Magazine. He has been a Professional Journalism Fellow at Stanford and an Alicia Patterson Fellow.

His first book, BEYOND THE PROMISED LAND: Jews and Arabs on the Hard Road to a New Israel, won the National Jewish Book Award. His second, RIVONIA'S CHILDREN: Three Families and the Cost of Conscience in White South Africa, was a finalist for the Alan Paton Award, South Africa’s most prestigious literary prize. His latest, THE SEARCHERS: The Making of an American Legend, published by Bloomsbury, was a New York Times and Los Angeles Times bestseller and a Library Journal Top Ten book for 2013. His new book explores the Hollywood blacklist and the making of the classic western High Noon.

Glenn Frankel

Books by Glenn Frankel

by Glenn Frankel - History, Nonfiction

It's one of the most revered movies of Hollywood's golden era. Starring screen legend Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly in her first significant film role, High Noon achieved instant box-office and critical success. Yet what has been often overlooked is that the movie was made during the height of the Hollywood blacklist, a time of political inquisition and personal betrayal. In the middle of the film shoot, screenwriter Carl Foreman was forced to testify before the House Committee on Un-American Activities about his former membership in the Communist Party. Examined in light of Foreman's testimony, High Noon's emphasis on courage and loyalty takes on deeper meaning and importance.

by Glenn Frankel - History, Nonfiction

In 1836 in East Texas, nine-year-old Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches. She was raised by the tribe and eventually became the wife of a warrior. Twenty-four years after her capture, she was reclaimed by the U.S. cavalry and the Texas Rangers and restored to her white family, to die in misery and obscurity. Cynthia Ann's story has been told and retold over generations to become a foundational American tale.