Review

When We Were Orphans

by Kazuo Ishiguro

Kazuo Ishiguro, author of THE REMAINS OF THE DAY (winner of the
Booker Prize) and AN ARTIST OF THE FLOATING WORLD (winner of the
Whitbread Award), has produced a work rich with history,
relationships, naive perceptions of the world, and lastly --- and
foremost --- charm. This intensely rich story is read by John Lee,
in a clipped, English quality, while providing Chinese and Japanese
dialects as the story moves to Shanghai.
Christopher Banks, our protagonist, lays out his life story
with all the heartache, desire, and loss of any man looking back on
a tragic life. The son of a diplomat, Christopher grew up in
Shanghai, seemingly protected from the rigors of poverty and
insecurity, want, or need for love, affection, or friendship. When
disaster struck, in the form of a family mysteriously divided, he
never gave up hope of finding his parents. He attended the best
schools and set out to become a detective, the profession he always
desired.
It
is this profession that brings him back to Shanghai 20 years later
in an ardent and frantic attempt to uncover the mystery surrounding
the disappearance of his parents and the role his Uncle Peter was
to play in it.
John
Lee's performance is outstanding as he takes on the character
roles, creating the identity of each, as the story unwinds to its
final twist. The listener can't help but feel the emotions of the
characters. Very well written and very well performed.

Reviewed by Marge Fletcher on January 24, 2011

When We Were Orphans
by Kazuo Ishiguro

  • Publication Date: September 1, 2000
  • Genres: Fiction, Literary Fiction
  • : pages
  • Publisher: HarperAudio
  • ISBN-10: 0694523844
  • ISBN-13: 9780694523849