Sandra Cisneros

Sandra Cisneros is the author of several books, including THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET, CARAMELO, LOOSE WOMAN, HAVE YOU SEEN MARIE?, and most recently, A HOUSE OF MY OWN.

She is the founder of two organizations that serve writers: the Macondo Foundation (now administered by the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center) and the Alfredo Cisneros del Moral Foundation.

Sandra is also the founder of the Latino MacArthur Fellows (Los MacArturos).

She has been honored with numerous awards including the MacArthur Fellowship, two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, and a Texas Medal of the Arts.

Sandra has been writing for more than 45 years, publishing for more than 40, and earning her living by her pen for more than 20 years. Her books have been translated into more than 20 languages and published internationally.  

Sandra Cisneros

Books by Sandra Cisneros

by Sandra Cisneros - Essays, Memoir, Nonfiction

From the Chicago neighborhoods where she grew up and set her groundbreaking THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET to her abode in Mexico in a region where “my ancestors lived for centuries,” the places Sandra Cisneros has lived have provided inspiration for her now-classic works of fiction and poetry. But a house of her own, where she could truly take root, has eluded her. With this collection --- spanning three decades and including never-before-published work --- Cisneros has come home at last.

by Sandra Cisneros - Fiction

Every year, Ceyala "Lala" Reyes' family--aunts, uncles, mothers, fathers, and Lala's six older brothers--packs up three cars and, in a wild ride, drive from Chicago to the Little Grandfather and Awful Grandmother's house in Mexico City for the summer. Struggling to find a voice above the boom of her brothers and to understand her place on this side of the border and that, Lala is a shrewd observer of family life. But when she starts telling the Awful Grandmother's life story, seeking clues to how she got to be so awful, grandmother accuses Lala of exaggerating. Soon, a multigenerational family narrative turns into a whirlwind exploration of storytelling, lies, and life. Like the cherished rebozo, or shawl, that has been passed down through generations of Reyes women, Caramelo is alive with the vibrations of history, family, and love.