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Julia Child

The only time to eat diet food is while you're waiting for the steak to cook.

Attribution

Julia Child

December 2014

We love the Christmas season! However, if you're like us, it may feel as though you were only just sitting down to Thanksgiving dinner! This year, I have been trying not to get caught up in the chaos that seems to accompany the holiday and instead to stay focused on the beauty and spriit of the season. Whether I'm reminiscing on the origins of a favorite ornament or reaching out to old friends with notes and calls, I am trying to strip out the gross commercialization and stay focused on keeping the meaning of the holiday.

December 19, 2014

There was a moment watching the news on Wednesday night that between the coverage of North Korea and Cuba, I felt like it was the late '50s or early ’60s. At any moment, I was expecting Ricky Ricardo to walk in and say, “Lucy, I’m home!” Years ago, I went on a business trip to the Caymans. As soon as I got off the plane, I was approached by people offering trips to Cuba; it was like it was the Wild West. Hmmmm…does this mean Cuban cigars will be legal? I have a number of friends whose families were part of the flight from Cuba, and I look forward to hearing what they have to say about this. We had the Cold War years. Are we now into the Cyber War years?

Julie Lewit-Nirenberg

A successful business executive, Julie’s experience includes building and marketing new enterprises both in the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. Her publishing experience is quite vast. It began with being a part of the launch of Ms. magazine. Julie then went on to work at Woman’s Day, Savvy and Esquire. She was the founding Publisher of New York Woman magazine, which broke new ground by effectively ‘networking’ women in the greater New York region.

Ali Smith, author of How to Be Both

HOW TO BE BOTH is a novel all about art’s versatility. Borrowing from painting’s fresco technique to make an original literary double-take, it’s a fast-moving genre-bending conversation between forms, times, truths and fictions. There’s a Renaissance artist of the 1460s. There’s the child of a child of the 1960s. Two tales of love and injustice twist into a singular yarn where time gets timeless, structural gets playful, knowing gets mysterious, fictional gets real --- and all of life’s givens are given a second chance.

Editorial Content for Tom Clancy Full Force and Effect: A Jack Ryan Novel

Contributors

Reviewer (text)

Ray Palen

The latest novel in the long-running Jack Ryan series, FULL FORCE AND EFFECT, is ironically current and relevant. This very week, we have witnessed Sony Pictures pulling the plug on the controversial comedy The Interview, in which two bumbling Americans are tasked with killing the leader of North Korea. Read More

Teaser

The international stalemate with North Korea continues into its seventh decade. A young, untested dictator is determined to prove his strength by breaking the deadlock. A rich deposit of valuable minerals have been found in the Hermit Kingdom. Coupled with their nuclear capabilities, the money from this find will make North Korea a dangerous force on the world stage. There’s just one more step needed to complete this perfect plan: the elimination of President Jack Ryan.

Promo

The international stalemate with North Korea continues into its seventh decade. A young, untested dictator is determined to prove his strength by breaking the deadlock. A rich deposit of valuable minerals have been found in the Hermit Kingdom. Coupled with their nuclear capabilities, the money from this find will make North Korea a dangerous force on the world stage. There’s just one more step needed to complete this perfect plan: the elimination of President Jack Ryan.

About the Book

A North Korean ICBM crashes into the Sea of Japan. A veteran CIA officer is murdered in Ho Chi Minh City and a package of forged documents goes missing. The pieces are there, but assembling the puzzle will cost Jack Ryan, Jr. and his fellow Campus agents precious time. Time they don't have.

The challenge facing President Jack Ryan is an old one with a terrifying new twist. The international stalemate with North Korea continues into its seventh decade. A young, untested dictator is determined to prove his strength by breaking the deadlock. Like his father before him, he hangs his plans on the country's nuclear ambitions. Until now, that program was impeded by a lack of resources. However, there has been a dramatic change in the nation's economic fortune. A rich deposit of valuable minerals have been found in the Hermit Kingdom. Coupled with their nuclear capabilities, the money from this find will make North Korea a dangerous force on the world stage.

There's just one more step needed to complete this perfect plan...the elimination of the president of the United States.

Editorial Content for Thief: A Robin Monarch Novel

Contributors

Reviewer (text)

Joe Hartlaub

Mark Sullivan has created a somewhat unique antihero in Robin Monarch, a thief-for-hire with illegal methods and pure motives. Monarch uses the proceeds of his somewhat ill-gotten gain to good end (see below) in order to pay a longstanding debt that, in his mind, can never be fully compensated. Sullivan utilizes exotic settings, hair-raising escapes, and reliance on cutting-edge technology (you will wish you had his toys) to present a reliably exciting series that always delivers more than it promises. Read More

Teaser

Robin Monarch is a man with a complicated past and dangerous present, but first and foremost, he is a thief of the highest order. Orphaned at 12, Monarch originally stole for survival, then he stole for his friends and cohorts, now he steals to give back to the woman who saved his life many years ago. Monarch finds a lead on what might be his most audacious exploit ever. A previously undiscovered tribe in South America may well have the secret to the most sought-after knowledge in history --- that of eternal life.

Promo

Robin Monarch is a man with a complicated past and dangerous present, but first and foremost, he is a thief of the highest order. Orphaned at 12, Monarch originally stole for survival, then he stole for his friends and cohorts, now he steals to give back to the woman who saved his life many years ago. Monarch finds a lead on what might be his most audacious exploit ever. A previously undiscovered tribe in South America may well have the secret to the most sought-after knowledge in history --- that of eternal life.

About the Book

Robin Monarch is a man with a complicated past and dangerous present. He’s been a soldier, a CIA agent, a freelance operative but first and foremost, Robin Monarch is a thief of the highest order. Orphaned at 12, Monarch originally stole for survival, then he stole for his friends and cohorts, now he steals to order, and to give back to the to the woman who saved his life many years ago.

With the help of his team, Monarch breaks into the legendary Christmas party of Beau Arsenault, a shady investor and behind-the-scenes player at the very highest levels of power politics. Arsenault is not above bending or breaking the rules if there’s illicit profit to be made. Monarch has decided that those illicit profits will be better used to take care of orphans and street kids. Using the party as cover to break into Arsenault’s secret vaults, Monarch comes away with two unexpected things. One is a bullet --- he gets shot when he’s caught trying to escape with tens of millions of negotiable instruments. The second is a lead on what might be his most audacious exploit ever. A previously undiscovered tribe in South America may well have the secret to the most sought after knowledge in history --- that of eternal life. And Robin Monarch must use all his skills --- as an operative, as a thief --- to keep this secret from falling into the worst possible hands.

Editorial Content for Hope: Entertainer of the Century

Reviewer (text)

Barbara Bamberger Scott

Leslie Townes Hope, known to the world as Bob Hope, was brought to America from England when he was five, son of a hard-drinking, plainspoken stonecutter and a scrimping mother who took in boarders. His life would become a Technicolor movie of the American dream, and he rang every change of the nation’s fast-evolving entertainment industry. As a scrappy teen, he joked, danced and sang his way from the street to the vaudeville stage​. He kept our radios warm with hours of hilarious airtime. Read More

Teaser

Bob Hope is a household name. However, as Richard Zoglin shows in this revelatory biography, there is still much to be learned about this most public of figures --- from his secret first marriage and his stint in reform school, to his indiscriminate womanizing and his ambivalent relationship with Bing Crosby and Johnny Carson. Hope could be cold, self-centered, tight with a buck, and perhaps the least introspective man in Hollywood. But he was also a dogged worker, gracious with fans and generous with friends.

Promo

Bob Hope is a household name. However, as Richard Zoglin shows in this revelatory biography, there is still much to be learned about this most public of figures --- from his secret first marriage and his stint in reform school, to his indiscriminate womanizing and his ambivalent relationship with Bing Crosby and Johnny Carson. Hope could be cold, self-centered, tight with a buck, and perhaps the least introspective man in Hollywood. But he was also a dogged worker, gracious with fans and generous with friends.

About the Book

The first definitive biography of Bob Hope, featuring exclusive and extensive reporting that makes the persuasive case that he was most important entertainer of the 20th century.

Born in 1903, and until his death in 2003, Bob Hope was the only entertainer to achieve top-rated success in every major mass-entertainment medium, from vaudeville to television and everything in between. He virtually invented modern stand-up comedy. His tours to entertain US troops and patriotic radio broadcasts, along with his all-American, brash-but-cowardly movie character, helped to ease the nation’s jitters during the stressful days of World War II. He helped redefine the very notion of what it means to be a star: a savvy businessman, pioneer of the brand extension (churning out books, writing a newspaper column, hosting a golf tournament), and public-spirited entertainer whose Christmas military tours and tireless work for charity set the standard for public service in Hollywood. But he became a polarizing figure during the Vietnam War, and the book sheds new light on his close relationship with President Richard Nixon during those embattled years.

Bob Hope is a household name. However, as Richard Zoglin shows in this revelatory biography, there is still much to be learned about this most public of figures, from his secret first marriage and his stint in reform school, to his indiscriminate womanizing and his ambivalent relationship with Bing Crosby and Johnny Carson. Hope could be cold, self-centered, tight with a buck, and perhaps the least introspective man in Hollywood. But he was also a dogged worker, gracious with fans, and generous with friends.

HOPE is both a celebration of an entertainer whose vast contribution has never been properly appreciated, and a complex portrait of a gifted but flawed man, who, unlike many Hollywood stars, truly loved being famous, appreciated its responsibilities, and handled celebrity with extraordinary grace.

Editorial Content for Skylight

Book

Contributors

Reviewer (text)

Michael Magras

Anyone who has ever had trouble getting a novel published should take comfort in the case of José Saramago. In 1953, when he was 31 and still an aspiring novelist, Saramago submitted the manuscript of his novel SKYLIGHT to a publishing house in Portugal. He received no response. Saramago was so distraught over the publisher’s indifference that he didn’t write another novel for almost 25 years. Read More

Teaser

Publishers rejected this early novel by the 1998 Nobel laureate when he submitted it to them in 1953. SKYLIGHT, now appearing in English translation for the first time, dramatizes the overlapping stories of more than a dozen tenants who live in a run-down apartment complex in late 1940s Lisbon. The book is less philosophical than José Saramago’s later works, but the sly wit and left-wing politics for which he became famous are here in abundance.

Promo

Publishers rejected this early novel by the 1998 Nobel laureate when he submitted it to them in 1953. SKYLIGHT, now appearing in English translation for the first time, dramatizes the overlapping stories of more than a dozen tenants who live in a run-down apartment complex in late 1940s Lisbon. The book is less philosophical than José Saramago’s later works, but the sly wit and left-wing politics for which he became famous are here in abundance.

About the Book

A previously unpublished novel by a literary master, SKYLIGHT tells the intertwined stories of the residents of a faded apartment building in 1940s Lisbon.

Silvestre and Mariana, a happily married elderly couple, take in a young nomad, Abel, and soon discover their many differences. Adriana loves Beethoven more than any man, but her budding sexuality brings new feelings to the surface. Carmen left Galicia to marry humble Emilio, but hates Lisbon and longs for her first love, Manolo. Lidia used to work the streets, but now she’s kept by Paulo, a wealthy man with a wandering eye.

These are just some of the characters in this early work, completed by Saramago in 1953 but never published until now. With his characteristic compassion, depth and wit, Saramago shows us the quiet contentment of a happy family and the infectious poison of an unhappy one. We see his characters’ most intimate moments as well as the casual encounters particular to neighbors living in close proximity. SKYLIGHT is a portrait of ordinary people, painted by a master of the quotidian, a great observer of the immense beauty and profound hardships of the modern world.