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Archives - September 2004

September 1, 2004

The truth is that there is nothing noble in being superior to somebody else. The only real nobility is in being superior to your former self.

– Whitney Young

September 2, 2004

The longer I live the more beautiful life becomes.

– Frank Lloyd Wright

September 3, 2004

You know that children are growing up when they start asking questions that have answers.

– John J. Plomp

September 4, 2004

Creativity is a drug I cannot live without.

– Cecil B. DeMille

September 5, 2004

I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief.


September 6, 2004

Labor Day is a glorious holiday because your child will be going back to school the next day. It would have been called Independence Day, but that name was already taken.

– Bill Dodds

September 7, 2004

Be careful about reading health books. You may die of a misprint.

– Mark Twain

September 8, 2004

Death is more universal than life; everyone dies but not everyone lives.

– A. Sachs

September 9, 2004

It's amazing that the amount of news that happens in the world every day always just exactly fits the newspaper.

– Jerry Seinfeld

September 10, 2004

A proverb is a short sentence based on long experience.

– Miguel de Cervantes

September 11, 2004

Those who dream by day are cognizant of many things which escape those who dream only by night.

– Edgar Allan Poe, "Eleonora"

September 12, 2004

The recipe for perpetual ignorance is: be satisfied with your opinions and content with your knowledge.

– Elbert Hubbard

September 13, 2004

Don't judge a man by his opinions, but what his opinions have made of him.

– Georg Christoph Lichtenberg

September 14, 2004

Cherish all your happy moments: they make a fine cushion for old age.

– Christopher Morley

September 15, 2004

It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.

– Andre Gide

September 16, 2004

I'm an idealist. I don't know where I'm going, but I'm on my way.

– Carl Sandburg, INCIDENTALS (1907)

September 17, 2004

I can't understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I'm frightened of the old ones.

– John Cage

September 18, 2004

After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.

– Aldous Huxley, MUSIC AT NIGHT (1931)

September 19, 2004

I'm astounded by people who want to 'know' the universe when it's hard enough to find your way around Chinatown.

– Woody Allen

September 20, 2004

When one door closes another door opens; but we so often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door, that we do not see the ones which open for us.

– Alexander Graham Bell

September 21, 2004

Man only likes to count his troubles, but he does not count his joys.

– Fyodor Dostoyevsky

September 22, 2004

Youth is like spring, an over praised season more remarkable for biting winds than genial breezes. Autumn is the mellower season, and what we lose in flowers we more than gain in fruits.

– Samuel Butler

September 23, 2004

If wrinkles must be written upon our brows, let them not be written upon the heart. The spirit should not grow old.

– James A. Garfield

September 24, 2004

Borrow trouble for yourself, if that's your nature, but don't lend it to your neighbors.

– Rudyard Kipling

September 25, 2004

The true measure of a man is how he treats someone who can do him absolutely no good.

– Samuel Johnson

September 26, 2004

The opposite of love is not hate, it's indifference. The opposite of art is not ugliness, it's indifference. The opposite of faith is not heresy, it's indifference. And the opposite of life is not death, it's indifference.

– Elie Wiesel

September 27, 2004

The very least you can do in your life is to figure out what you hope for. And the most you can do is live inside that hope. Not admire it from a distance but live right in it, under its roof.

– Barbara Kingsolver

September 28, 2004

That which is static and repetitive is boring. That which is dynamic and random is confusing. In between lies art.

– John A. Locke

September 29, 2004

The length of a film should be directly related to the endurance of the human bladder.

– Alfred Hitchcock, in SIMON ROSE'S CLASSIC FILM GUIDE (1995)

September 30, 2004

I read and walked for miles at night along the beach, writing bad blank verse and searching endlessly for someone wonderful who would step out of the darkness and change my life. It never crossed my mind that that person could be me.

– Anna Quindlen