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Eric Weiner

Biography

Eric Weiner

For as long as he can remember, Eric Weiner wanted to be a foreign correspondent. So he could hardly believe his good fortune when, one day in 1993, NPR dispatched him to India as the network's first full-time correspondent in that country. Weiner spent two of the best years of his life based in New Delhi, covering everything from an outbreak of bubonic plague to India's economic reforms, before moving on to other postings in Jerusalem and Tokyo.

Over the past decade, he's reported from more than 30 countries, most of them profoundly unhappy. He traveled to Iraq several times during the reign of Saddam Hussein. He was in Afghanistan in 2001, when the Taliban regime fell.

He's also served as a correspondent for NPR in New York, Miami and, currently, Washington, D.C. Weiner is a former reporter for The New York Times and was a Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University. He was part of a team of NPR reporters that won a 1994 Peabody award for a series of investigative reports about the U.S.
tobacco industry.

His commentary has appeared in the Los Angeles Times,
Slate and The New Republic, among other publications.
After traveling the world, he has settled, quasi-happily, in the Washington area, where he divides his time between his living room and his kitchen. He lives with his wife and daughter and their chronically overweight cat. He (Eric, not the cat) is an unrepentant sushi lover. Tekka maki, in particular.

Eric Weiner

Books by Eric Weiner

by Eric Weiner - Memoir, Nonfiction, Religion, Travel

When a health scare puts him in the hospital, Eric Weiner --- an agnostic by default --- finds himself tangling with an unexpected question, posed to him by a well-meaning nurse. "Have you found your God yet?" The thought of it nags him, and ultimately he embarks on a worldwide exploration of countless religions to find personal spiritual meaning.