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Deborah Campbell

Biography

Deborah Campbell

Deborah Campbell is an award-winning writer who has reported from many countries around the world, including Iran, Syria, Jordan, Egypt, Lebanon, Israel, Palestine, Mexico, Cuba and Russia. Her work, much of which involves spending long periods of time in the societies she covers, has appeared in Harper's, The Economist, The Guardian, New Scientist, and Foreign Policy, and she is the recipient of three National Magazine Awards for her foreign correspondence. A DISAPPEARANCE IN DAMASCUS won the 2016 Hilary Weston Writers’ Trust Prize for Non-Fiction. Campbell has guest lectured at Harvard, Berkeley, Zayed University in Dubai, and the National Press Club in Washington. She teaches at the University of British Columbia.

Deborah Campbell

Books by Deborah Campbell

by Deborah Campbell - History, Nonfiction

The story begins in 2007 when Deborah Campbell travels undercover to Damascus to report on the exodus of Iraqis into Syria following the overthrow of Saddam Hussein. There she meets and hires Ahlam, a refugee working as a “fixer” --- providing Western media with trustworthy information and contacts to get the news out. Ahlam, who fled her home in Iraq after being kidnapped, not only supports her husband and two children but is setting up a makeshift school for displaced girls. Campbell is inspired by her determination. But one morning Ahlam is seized from her home in front of Campbell’s eyes. Haunted by the prospect that their work together has led to her friend’s arrest, Campbell spends the months that follow desperately trying to find her.